Editing DNA sequencing

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I use a 25 μL [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polymerase_chain_reaction PCR] reaction which includes 1 μL of 10 μM forward [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primer_(molecular_biology) primer], 1 μL of 10 μM reverse primer, 1 μL DNA template and the [https://www.google.com/search?q=pcr+master+mix&oq=PCR+master+mix PCR master mix]. I use the Taq Meangreen 2x Master Mix [https://empiricalbioscience.com/shop/rae/grouping-3-rae/taq-2x-meangreen-master-mix-copy-2/<nowiki>], which already has loading dye included.</nowiki>
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I use a 25 μL [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polymerase_chain_reaction PCR] reaction which includes 1 μL of 10 μM forward [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primer_(molecular_biology) primer], 1 μL of 10 μM reverse primer, 1 μL DNA template and the [https://www.google.com/search?q=pcr+master+mix&oq=PCR+master+mix PCR master mix]. I use the Taq Keengreen 2x Master Mix [https://www.ibisci.com/products/ibi-taq-keengreen-2x-master-mix?_pos=1&_sid=46411e7d6&_ss=r<nowiki>], which already has loading dye included.</nowiki>
   
 
The current PCR program I am using is an initial denaturation of two minutes at 95 degrees C, followed by 30 cycles of denaturation at 95 degrees for 30 seconds, annealing at 54 degrees for 30 seconds and an extension phase of 72 degrees for 55 seconds. Since the DNA we are amplifying typically isn't very long, it is probably ok to omit the final extension phase of 6 minutes at 70 degrees. The 54 degree annealing temperature was chosen by looking up the [http://biotools.nubic.northwestern.edu/OligoCalc.html melting point] of the primers and subtracting 3 - 5 degrees.
 
The current PCR program I am using is an initial denaturation of two minutes at 95 degrees C, followed by 30 cycles of denaturation at 95 degrees for 30 seconds, annealing at 54 degrees for 30 seconds and an extension phase of 72 degrees for 55 seconds. Since the DNA we are amplifying typically isn't very long, it is probably ok to omit the final extension phase of 6 minutes at 70 degrees. The 54 degree annealing temperature was chosen by looking up the [http://biotools.nubic.northwestern.edu/OligoCalc.html melting point] of the primers and subtracting 3 - 5 degrees.
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